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Slide #36 What can the community Do?

Slide#37 - Social Compass To investigate the perspectives of the community, I used a framework called a Social Compass. This compass is used to analyze the issue of dropout from all perspectives of all individuals, groups, organizations, institutions, and community people who are affected by Inuit student dropout. The list considers most everyone involved: student, parent, elder; community leaders, Nunavut leaders/ government, employment agencies, teachers and principals. In small communities everyone is affected by student dropout and school failure. To consider all perspectives requires a framework that can examine a number of factors. Social Compass from Connor (1987) twelve point compass in which each point outlines various questions to consider when evaluating a social issue like dropout considered in a systematic way to help to clarify complex issues. Inuit dropout is such a complex issue which extends beyond the walls of the school and into the community and family.

Slide #38 - Considering Inuit Dropout from a Community Perspective:

Using the Social Compass as a framework, you can begin to get a picture of how student dropout is viewed by the community. . . Here is a list of questions: (see slide)

Slide #39-Ethic of Non-Interference

An interesting look at Native perspectives with respect to community interaction between people. Rupert Ross (1992) makes an interesting argument for the Ethic of Non-Interference. This one of the oldest and pervasive ethics practised by Native people. In the Native society it is wrong for one person to interfere with anotherŐs choices or actions. This ethic is most evident when it comes to child-rearing; traditional rules required parents to permit their children to make their own choice in virtually every aspect of life. Thus, this Ethic of Non-Interference evident in Native culture directly influences what is happening in schools. The Ethic of Noninterference explains why most parents have difficulties forcing their children to attend school once the child has decided they no longer want to attend. Although they may want to see their child do well in school, it would be wrong in the Inuit culture to interfere with the childŐs right to behave as they please. Of course this Ethic of Noninterference is an element that is often overlooked as non-Natives find it easier to believe that Native parents simply do not care for their children or are unfit parents.

Slide #40- Community Development

As Connor (1987) notes, Ňeach element is related to each other element, so the change in one will eventually result in a change in all of the othersÓ (p. 9). This can be illustrated when one considers the Knowledge and Beliefs element. In mainstream society, parents believe that a good education will provide a good livelihood and therefore it is the Norm in the society to send children to school because the Social Rank says that education is the Goal of youth. In Inuit culture this may not always be the case.

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